What Is the Christian Doctrine and Why Should You Care?

Merle M. DeLancey Jr.

The Christian Doctrine

The Christian doctrine provides that a mandatory statute or regulation that expresses a significant or deeply ingrained strand of public procurement policy shall be read into a federal contract by operation of law, even if the clause is not in the contract. G. L. Christian & Associates v. United States, 312 F.2d 418 (Ct. Cl. 1963). The doctrine is an exception to the general rule that the government must put vendors on notice of contract requirements, whether expressly or through incorporation by reference. It also is an exception to standard commercial contracting practices and contract interpretation principles. The rationale for the doctrine is that procurement policies set by higher authority cannot be avoided or evaded (deliberately or negligently) by lower government officials. Continue reading “What Is the Christian Doctrine and Why Should You Care?”

Government Contractor Shutdown Advisory

Justin A. Chiarodo and Albert B. Krachman

With yet another government shutdown looming, contractors face a number of uncertainties and challenges that warrant close attention—regardless of whether a shutdown takes place or how long it lasts. Among other challenges, contractors may face a lack of incremental funding; the inability to enter into new contracts or contract modifications; closed government facilities; furloughed government employees; delayed payments; increased indirect costs; and unexercised and deferred contract options. Below we offer six suggestions to help address key areas impacted by a shutdown, including contract funding, internal and external communications, recordkeeping, and deadlines. Continue reading “Government Contractor Shutdown Advisory”

Litigants Lose Extra Three Days to Respond under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure When Filing Electronically

Lyndsay A. Gorton

Lyndsay A. GortonOn December 1, 2016, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (the “Rules”) were amended to make the “three-day rule” inapplicable to electronic filers and litigants who agree to receive filings electronically. The “three-day rule” provided an additional three days to respond if a filing was not served personally, i.e., if it is mailed or electronically filed. Although we do not normally alert our contacts to these types of procedural changes, this one could have significant impacts on federal government contractors, particularly those who are involved in lawsuits in the Eastern District of Virginia’s “Rocket Docket.” Continue reading “Litigants Lose Extra Three Days to Respond under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure When Filing Electronically”