Spring Cleaning for Government Contractors? Think Compliance.

Merle M. DeLancey Jr.

If you’re like me, it’s the time of year when you clean out your garage and closets and do all those outside projects you delayed until the weather warmed up. If you are a government contractor, you should consider this to be the season to do some spring cleaning in terms of your government contract compliance programs and procedures. Not to be an alarmist, but there are numerous areas you can review now and, if you should find some compliance deficiencies, you still have ample time to get your house in order before an agency audit or the deadline for submission of certain government reports.

Set forth below is a list of areas you may want to clean up: Continue reading “Spring Cleaning for Government Contractors? Think Compliance.”

OFCCP Releases FY 2019 CSAL

Merle M. DeLancey Jr.

On March 25, 2019, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (“OFCCP”) issued a Corporate Scheduling Announcement List (“CSAL”) for FY 2019. As it announced in February, OFCCP changed how it notifies government prime contractors and subcontractors that they may be subject to a compliance review. Rather than sending the traditional advanced notification letters, OFCCP posted the FY 2019 CSAL on its website. In addition to the CSAL, OFCCP also posted its Scheduling Methodology, CSAL Frequently Asked Questions (“FAQs”), Corporate Management Compliance Evaluation (“CMCE”) FAQs, and a link to its Section 503 Focused Review page.

OFCCP significantly increased the number of contractors potentially subject to review to more than 3,500. OFCCP’s CSALs for FY 2018 and 2017 identified 1,003 and 802 contractors, respectively. Continue reading “OFCCP Releases FY 2019 CSAL”

Renewed Focus on Contractor Business System Reviews

Sara N. Gerber

According to a recent U.S. Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) report, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (“DCAA”) and the Defense Contract Management Agency (“DCMA”) have taken certain steps to improve the contractor business system (“CBS”) review process and are forecasting that CBS reviews will increase significantly over the next four years. Contractor business systems include a contractor’s accounting, earned value management, estimating, purchasing, material management, and property management systems. These systems require contractors to maintain internal controls that, as GAO noted, “act as the first line of defense against fraud, waste and abuse of federal funding.” Given their importance, the renewed focus on ensuring CBS reviews are conducted in a timely and consistent manner is not surprising, and contractors should prepare for a new wave of audit activity. Continue reading “Renewed Focus on Contractor Business System Reviews”

States Pass Fewer Drug Manufacturer Pricing Disclosure Laws in 2018

Merle M. DeLancey Jr.

While the introduction of state legislation that would require drug manufacturers to disclose pricing and other information did not slow down in 2018, the number of bills that were made law did slow down. During 2018, 22 state legislatures considered bills seeking to require drug manufacturers to disclose pricing information; however, most of the legislation failed.

Two New State Laws

Since my Drug Manufacturer Pricing Disclosures: Mid-Year 2018 Update, two states—Vermont and New Hampshire—passed laws that arguably touch on requiring pharmaceutical manufacturers to report drug prices.[1] Continue reading “States Pass Fewer Drug Manufacturer Pricing Disclosure Laws in 2018”

OFCCP’s New Voluntary Program Exempts “High-Performing” Contractors from Compliance Evaluations

Robyn N. Burrows

On February 13, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (“OFCCP”) issued Directive 2019-04 which establishes a framework for the Voluntary Enterprise-wide Review Program (“VERP”). Under this new program, OFCCP will work with “high-performing” contractors to achieve sustained, corporate-wide compliance with the laws and regulations OFCCP administers and enforces requiring nondiscrimination and equal employment opportunity. Notably, participating contractors are removed from the pool of contractors scheduled for compliance evaluations.

Eligibility for Participation

Contractors can apply to the program beginning in fiscal year 2020. As part of the application, OFCCP will conduct compliance reviews of the contractor’s headquarters location as well as a sample or subset of establishments. Contractors must meet established criteria verifying basic compliance with OFCCP’s requirements and must further demonstrate their commitment to and application of successful equal employment opportunity programs on a corporate-wide basis. Continue reading “OFCCP’s New Voluntary Program Exempts “High-Performing” Contractors from Compliance Evaluations”

Top 10 Trends and Compliance Obligations in the Evolving World of Commercial Item Procurement

Blank Rome Partner Justin A. Chiarodo will be a presenter at BDO’s Winter 2019 Marketplace Outlook Update for Government Contractors, “Top 10 Trends and Compliance Obligations in the Evolving World of Commercial Item Procurement.” This live webinar will take place Thursday, February 28, 2019, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. EST.

For more information, please visit our website.

Who Is a Subcontractor under a Federal Government Contract?

Merle M. DeLancey Jr.

Recently, clients have asked if they or a vendor or supplier are a “subcontractor” under a federal government contract. Sometimes the answer is easy—e.g., you are a subcontractor when a prime contractor contracts directly with a vendor or supplier (hereinafter “vendor”) to perform a federal contract. But the lines become less clear when a prime contractor does not inform the vendor that the subcontract is being entered into in furtherance of a federal government contract or where the vendor supplies goods that the prime contractor uses to perform commercial and government contracts.

Why Is Subcontractor Status Important?

Subcontractor status is important to prime and subcontractors. A federal prime contractor is required to flow-down multiple Federal Acquisition Regulation (“FAR”) clauses to its subcontractors. See FAR 52.212-5(e). The required flowdown clauses that receive the most attention implement three antidiscrimination laws: Executive Order 11246, Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; 29 U.S.C. § 793; and Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act, 38 U.S.C. § 4212. A prime contractor’s failure to flow down these clauses to its subcontractors could result in the prime contractor being held responsible and/or liable for its subcontractor’s noncompliance. Continue reading “Who Is a Subcontractor under a Federal Government Contract?”