Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Final Rule Takes Effect in October: Are You Ready?

Christian N. Curran

Christian N. Curran

In what may be the most significant change to contractor compliance this year, the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces final rule takes effect on October 25, 2016. On August 25, 2016, the FAR Council and Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued the final rule and guidance implementing the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order, also known as “The Blacklisting Order” (originally issued on July 31, 2014). The order created new requirements for contractors, adding pre- and post-award reporting demands on covered contracts regarding contractor compliance with 14 separate labor laws. The proposed rule that was published on May 28, 2015, resulted in over 10,000 comments being submitted. The rule contains substantial new compliance obligations for contractors and drastic consequences for noncompliance. As discussed below, contractors need to take immediate steps in order to ensure readiness for these expansive new obligations. Continue reading “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Final Rule Takes Effect in October: Are You Ready?”

Five Things Government Contractors Should Keep in Mind about Political Activities this Election Season

Justin Chiarodo and Stephanie Zechmann

ChiarodoJ+ZechmannSThe 2016 election season is unlike any other in recent memory. But like elections past and yet to come, political contributions and lobbying remain a mainstay of the political process. This is particularly true in the federal government contracting community, which is heavily influenced by executive and legislative action (and inaction). Though we can expect the unexpected in the three months leading up to the election, we offer below five fundamental “do’s and don’ts” that government contractors should keep in mind to guide their political activities. Continue reading “Five Things Government Contractors Should Keep in Mind about Political Activities this Election Season”

SBA Final Rule Expanding Mentor-Protégé Program to Take Effect This Month

Justin A. Chiarodo and Christian N. Curran

Chiarodo+CurranAfter a long wait and much anticipation, the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) issued its final rule expanding the mentor-protégé program to all small businesses on July 25, 2016. The new rule broadly expands upon the existing 8(a) mentor-protégé program, and is projected to result in $2 billion in federal contracts to program participants. Though the final rule largely tracks the February 2015 proposed rule, which we previously wrote about here, the final rule does make some key changes, including changes regarding size certification and reporting. As the new rule goes into effect on August 24, 2016, contractors both large and small should prepare now to take advantage of what the newly expanded program has to offer. Continue reading “SBA Final Rule Expanding Mentor-Protégé Program to Take Effect This Month”

GSA’s Transactional Data Reporting Rule Ushers in a New Era

Merle DeLanceyJustin Chiarodo and Philip Beshara

Merle DelanceyJustin A. Chiarodo CC2030E479B404E304DCCE7B55CFAC26

Last month, the General Services Administration (“GSA”) finalized a rule marking what the agency describes as the most significant development to its Schedules program in over two decades. The rule completely changes how GSA will analyze vendor pricing for products and services.

Under the rule, vendors will eventually be required to submit monthly transactional data reports with information related to orders and prices under certain GSA Schedule contracts and other vehicles. Along with the implementation of the new Transactional Data Reporting (“TDR”) requirement, GSA will relieve vendors from two preexisting compliance burdens—eliminating the Commercial Sales Practices (“CSP”) and Price Reductions Clause (“PRC”) reporting requirements when vendors begin submitting transactional data.

While vendors should welcome the relief provided from the elimination of two burdensome regulations, the shift to TDR will not be without cost and risk; and, the eventual efficiencies promised by GSA remain to be seen. Indeed, the impact of the change will likely extend beyond compliance burdens, with potential effects varying from the nature of False Claims Act suits to the potential publication of competitive information.

We summarize these and other key takeaways from the new rule below, and answer questions important to vendors as GSA rolls out this significant development. Continue reading “GSA’s Transactional Data Reporting Rule Ushers in a New Era”

Department of Labor Issues Final Rule Updating Sex Discrimination Guidelines

Merle M. DeLancey and Lyndsay A. Gorton

DeLancey+GortonOn June 15, 2016, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (“OFCCP”) issued a final rule updating its 1970 sex discrimination guidelines. The final rule, available here, enforces Executive Order 11246, which prohibits federal contractors and subcontractors from employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin. The rule applies to companies that have federal government contracts of $10,000 or more and will be effective on August 15, 2016. Continue reading “Department of Labor Issues Final Rule Updating Sex Discrimination Guidelines”

How UHS v. U.S. ex rel. Escobar Will Impact Government Contractors

David Yang and Christian N. Curran

David YangChristian N. CurranOn June 16, 2016, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar, holding that “implied certification” is a valid theory of liability under the False Claims Act (“FCA”), and further concluding that a failure to comply with a contract requirement, regulation, or statute may support a false claims case even if the provision is not an “express condition of payment.” While the unanimous opinion settles the debate over the viability of the implied certification theory, its reliance on a subjective materiality standard will likely make FCA cases more difficult to resolve on the pleadings and also increase the number of FCA cases filed. Continue reading “How UHS v. U.S. ex rel. Escobar Will Impact Government Contractors”

Air Force Utility Privatization Saves Real Money

National Defense Magazine

Albert B. Krachman

Krachman, Albert. B.The Air Force utilities privatization program has realized significant savings for the government, while also encountering some regulatory growing pains. Recent project accomplishments include saving $19.3 million in natural gas costs per year at a $1.1 million transaction cost, reducing water consumption by 28 percent, and reducing electric system outages by almost 40 percent. The program has saved the Air Force an estimated $520 million over the 50-year life cycle of projects, compared to continued government ownership.

With the current Department of Defense focus on energy security, this is good news. But the program still faces some open issues in the areas of labor standards and terminations that will need to be resolved in the future.

There are 270 Air Force utility systems left to evaluate for privatization. Because of the program’s success, the Air Force is adjusting the intake of new systems for evaluation so that it can match procurement resources with the number of systems in review.  Continue reading “Air Force Utility Privatization Saves Real Money”