COVID-19 Disruptions and Work Stoppages: A Q&A for Federal Contractors

Justin A. Chiarodo and Stephanie M. Harden

Coronavirus COVID-19 is rapidly disrupting the performance of federal government contracts across all sectors, leaving contractors and subcontractors with more questions than answers on how to structure their operations. In the following Q&A, we address some of the top issues contractors are currently facing.

      1. The Government has closed my work site, precluding my employees from performing their work. If I continue to pay the employees, can I recover those costs?

If your employees cannot perform their work because the work site is closed (and telework is not an option due to the nature of the work), this may be construed as an actual or constructive stop work order. As with a government shutdown, contractors facing this scenario may be entitled to an equitable adjustment to account for idle employee time because they are expected to be ready to perform as soon as the Government reopens facilities.

A March 20 Memorandum from Office of Management and Budget Deputy Director for Management Margaret Weichert (“Weichert Memorandum”) confirms that equitable adjustments may be appropriate if the requested costs are reasonable. Specifically, the Weichert Memorandum advises that such requests “should be considered on a case-by-case basis” and that agencies may consider such factors as “whether it is beneficial to keep skilled professionals or key personnel in a mobile ready state for activities the agency deems critical to national security or other high priorities (e.g., national security professionals, skilled scientists).” Continue reading “COVID-19 Disruptions and Work Stoppages: A Q&A for Federal Contractors”

Three Vital Steps to Prepare For COVID-19 Impacts to Contract Performance

Albert B. Krachman, Scott Arnold, and Michael J. Slattery

As the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic continues its mass global disruption, federal contractors should take or accelerate steps to protect themselves. Three steps stand out in our view:

    1. review contracts;
    2. identify and document cost disruptions; and
    3. communicate, communicate, communicate—in writing—with your Contracting Officers.

How You May Be Impacted

How might your business be impacted? Supply chain disruptions may deprive contractors of materials required to stay on schedule and complete performance. COVID-19 exposure for employees and key personnel may deprive the contractor of needed labor. Spread of the disease among government employees may lead to a delay in approvals, or could lead to a quarantine of government facilities, which could impact the ability of service contractors to timely perform their contractual obligations—not unlike a government shutdown. (See Government Contractor Shutdown Advisory for steps to be taken if government facilities are quarantined or shut down due to the virus). Continue reading “Three Vital Steps to Prepare For COVID-19 Impacts to Contract Performance”